Jazz Festival

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Jazz Festival

Jazz is an amazing medium that invites creativity, innovation, play, and striving for new ways to express oneself.  Participation is a role that everyone gets to play;  performers and listeners alike.

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Using Cranial Osteopathy to Treat Plagiocephaly

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Using Cranial Osteopathy to Treat Plagiocephaly

What could possibly be a better motivation to study and work to improve your abilities as a physician than the opportunity to improve the trajectory of a young child’s life?  The benefit to the family’s health and wellbeing is a ripple from that as well.

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The Beginning of Life

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The Beginning of Life

The Beginning of Life

Beth and I watched this film over the weekend.  It is phenomenal, an inspiring and deeply moving film.  It deals with the things that are at the center of both Beth and my vocational calling—to help children, their parents, families, and community thrive and have the opportunity for a full and meaningful life.  Families from all over the world are featured.  You will see astonishing contrasts in the conditions for children and their parents in different parts of the world.  You will learn how incredibly important it is for us to invest our time and love and ability to care for them so they can thrive and it will make your heart soar.  You will see how the lack of societal infrastructure to give parents the time to invest in their children is so damaging to all of us and it will make your heart ache. 

It does take a whole village to raise one child. This is the best film I’ve ever seen to show us what that really means.

DNG

Directed by Estela Renner

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The Undiscovered Self

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The Undiscovered Self

You may recognize the title of this entry as the name of the book written by Carl Gustav Jung in 1957.  In fact, I pulled that book off my shelf about six weeks ago and re-read the first chapter, entitled “The Plight of the Individual in Modern Society.”  It gave me such pause that I put it away until yesterday when I read it again and the second chapter with it.  Why?  Because he might have been writing about his concerns about the ability of democracy to function in the year 2016 as we approach the coming presidential election in the United States. He wrote it as the Cold War was escalating. See what you think. Here are some excerpts from the chapter that I found especially prophetic.

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Discovering the Self

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Discovering the Self

“Man has to be unselfish if he wants peace in the world.  Remove selfishness and egoism.  Calm the passions.  Purify the heart.  Analyze your thoughts.  Scrutinize your motives.  Cleanse the dross of impurity.  Realize God.  All this you will obtain as a direct reaction to self-knowledge.  That much is certain.” 

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Texas DO gets in tune with musicians

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Texas DO gets in tune with musicians

This is what I do with the College of Music at Michigan State University. Please enjoy. 

The following was originally posted on the website of the DOs (Osteopathic Physicians) on June 3, 2016.

MUSICIAN HEALTH

How I Practice: Texas DO gets in tune with musicians

Sajid Surve, DO, talks about the changing world of music education and why osteopathic physicians are uniquely qualified to treat musicians.

Musicians at the University of North Texas (UNT) College of Music recognize that when it comes to their health, the Texas Center for Performing Arts Health is a helpful instrument.

A musician himself, Sajid Surve, DO, co-director of the Texas Center for Performing Arts Health, a partnership between the UNT College of Music and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth, discovered early on that music and medicine share a common goal: to heal. In this edited interview, he discusses the center’s efforts to help change music education and the reason DOs are uniquely qualified to treat musicians.

What is the Texas Center for Performing Arts Health?

The center, known as the Texas Center for Music & Medicine until two years ago, provides health care to performance artists and studies the performing arts population from a health perspective. It’s a lively research hub with a clinical presence. We have pianos with sensors built into the keys so we can measure the forces that pianists use, and we have sensors for trumpets to look at mouthpiece forces.

Is this research influencing music education?

Yes. Music education is changing right now. The UNT College of Music and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine worked together to build a body of evidence to show that musicians have pretty high injury rates. We then joined with other groups to recommend that the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) create new standards requiring colleges to make students aware of the musculoskeletal, hearing, and vocal risks of making music. Because of our efforts, NASM issued the new standards a few years ago. The Texas Education Agency adopted similar standards for high school and middle school students.

What matters to me is that the musician is now better at playing music because of what I’ve done.

What’s the most common condition you see in musicians?

In general, musicians suffer from repetitive stress injuries. Every instrument has unique demands and as a result, they have these unique injuries. Trombonists, for example, can develop shoulder problems from the weight of the trumpet. Pianists often have hand problems. Clarinetists and oboists develop right thumb problems.

What does treatment look like?

With an osteopathic approach, we have to consider the whole situation. My focus isn’t necessarily on the instrument. For example, posture is how your body rises up to meet the instrument. Any aberration in a musician’s posture can cause neck and back pain. Maybe we give the patient a strengthening program to improve their posture. Or maybe they need to take more breaks. Or we need to treat their shoulder with osteopathic manipulative treatment. I do a ton of OMT in the clinic.

Treating musicians’ injuries can be really tough if you don’t approach treatment with the mindset of considering the whole patient. This is why DOs are uniquely qualified to treat musicians. I’m so thankful to have my osteopathic background.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?

I had the fortune of helping a young singer who had been injured and was unable to sing. She came to me with paperwork to withdraw from the university, but over the course of six to seven months she was able to sing again. She invited me to her senior recital, and sitting in that audience watching her deliver stunningly beautiful arias, knowing that I had a part in making that happen, was one of the greatest moments ever.

What matters to me is that the musician is now better at playing music because of what I’ve done. 

 

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